How To Order
We believe in good old fashioned customer relations, there is no automated check-out here.Each order will be dealt with personally by a member of our sales team. Please include the item description, reference number and your postal area with all correspondence. All of our packages are dispatched via recorded and insured delivery every working weekday.
Payment Methods
We accept most methods of online payments, and all major credit/debit cards, UK cheques, & postal orders in GB Pounds. For more information contact us on sales@dugup.co.uk or visit our Contact page.

(Please check out the Ordnance Pages & Medals for more items from this era)

WW1 Chinese Labour Corp's Badge 1.8299

£245

WW1 Chinese Labour Corp

A total of about 140,000 Chinese workers served on the Western Front during and after the War.  Among them, 100,000 served in the British Chinese Labour Corps. About 40,000 served with the French forces, and hundreds of Chinese students served as translators.

By the end of 1917 there were 54,000 Chinese labourers with the British Imperial forces in France and Belgium. In March the Admiralty declared itself no longer able to supply the ships for transport and the British government were obliged to bring recruitment to an end. The men already serving in France completed their contracts. By the time of the Armistice, the Chinese Labour Corps numbered nearly 96,000, while 30,000 were working for the French.  In May 1919, 80,000 Chinese Labour Corps were still at work.

The workers, mainly aged between 20 and 35, served as labour in the rear echelons or helped build munitions depots. They were tasked with carrying out essential work to support the frontline troops, such as unloading ships, building dugouts, repairing roads and railways, digging trenches and filling sandbags. Some worked in armaments factories, others in naval shipyards, for a pittance of one to three francs a day. At the time they were seen just as cheap labour, not even allowed out of camp to fraternise locally, dismissed as mere coolies. When the war ended some were used for mine clearance, or to recover the bodies of soldiers and fill in miles of trenches. Men fell ill from the poor diet and the intense damp and cold, and on occasion they mutinied against their French and British employers or ransacked local restaurants in search of food.  Their contribution went forgotten for decades until military ceremonies resumed in 2002 at the Chinese cemetery of Noyelles-sur-Mer.

WW1 Chinese Labour Corp's Badge 1.8299

£245

WW1 Chinese Labour Corp

A total of about 140,000 Chinese workers served on the Western Front during and after the War.  Among them, 100,000 served in the British Chinese Labour Corps. About 40,000 served with the French forces, and hundreds of Chinese students served as translators.

By the end of 1917 there were 54,000 Chinese labourers with the British Imperial forces in France and Belgium. In March the Admiralty declared itself no longer able to supply the ships for transport and the British government were obliged to bring recruitment to an end. The men already serving in France completed their contracts. By the time of the Armistice, the Chinese Labour Corps numbered nearly 96,000, while 30,000 were working for the French.  In May 1919, 80,000 Chinese Labour Corps were still at work.

The workers, mainly aged between 20 and 35, served as labour in the rear echelons or helped build munitions depots. They were tasked with carrying out essential work to support the frontline troops, such as unloading ships, building dugouts, repairing roads and railways, digging trenches and filling sandbags. Some worked in armaments factories, others in naval shipyards, for a pittance of one to three francs a day. At the time they were seen just as cheap labour, not even allowed out of camp to fraternise locally, dismissed as mere coolies. When the war ended some were used for mine clearance, or to recover the bodies of soldiers and fill in miles of trenches. Men fell ill from the poor diet and the intense damp and cold, and on occasion they mutinied against their French and British employers or ransacked local restaurants in search of food.  Their contribution went forgotten for decades until military ceremonies resumed in 2002 at the Chinese cemetery of Noyelles-sur-Mer.